Career Exploration Self Directed Assessment

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Career Exploration Self Directed Assessment
Diversity Statement Continuing or Community Care? CC - Do you have what it takes? CC - Things to Consider CC - Skills, Interests CC - Do you have what it takes? CC- Things to consider CC - Skills, Interests CC - Is it a good fit?

Diversity Statement

Diversity Statement

The Health Care Human Resource Sector Council is committed to a diverse and sustainable health and community services workforce. The Sector Council and our Advisory Group members for this project believe that diversity encompasses:

Inclusion

Appreciating and valuing human differences by creating an atmosphere that promotes a sense of belonging: where everyone feels respected and valued for their uniqueness. In an inclusive environment each person is recognized and developed, and their skills are routinely tapped in to. In an inclusive environment people are valued because of, not in spite of, their differences so everyone can fully participate and thrive.

Inclusive Culture

An inclusive culture involves the full and successful integration of diverse people into an organization. While an inclusive culture certainly encompasses a commitment to workplace diversity, it is not limited simply to basic representation; it indicates a climate in which respect, equity, and positive recognition of differences are all cultivated, and the social and institutional response to disability poses no barrier to a positive service experience.

Diversity

The range of characteristics that make individuals unique. These characteristics include, but are not limited to, dimensions such as national origin, language, race, color, disability, ethnicity, gender, age, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, socioeconomic status and family structures.

Continuing or Community Care?

Is a career in the continuing or community care right for you?

The Continuing and Community Care sectors in Nova Scotia can offer almost anyone a satisfying career with lots of opportunities for growth. Direct care personnel provide an invaluable contribution to the health and well-being of individuals, families and communities.

With the variety of careers available in the sectors you can utilize almost any talent you may have. With so many career choices there’s a place in continuing and community care for almost everyone. So, consider a career in one of these areas. It may just be the right path for you!

The first step to finding a career in these sectors is to discover what interests, abilities, skills and values you possess, and which sector has roles that will best suit your personality. You can start by watching the videos to help identify which career may be the best fit for you.

Continuing Care Assistant (CCA) 

Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)

Registered Nurse (RN)

Resident Care Worker (RCW) 

CC - Do you have what it takes?

A Career in Community Care

Do you have what it takes?

The Nova Scotia Department of Community Services Disability Support Program (DSP) “serves children, youth and adults with intellectual disabilities, long-term mental illness and physical disabilities in a range of community-based, residential and vocational/day programs. These are voluntary programs designed to support people at various stages of their development and independence”. (Reference Government of NS.)

CC - Things to Consider

Things to consider:

A number of agencies across the province provide services for the Department and they employ Community/Residential care workers (RCW). These workers support people with disabilities who need varying level of assistance. They carry a tremendous amount of responsibility, both regarding the persons to whom they provide support and concerning the tasks they are completing. Belief in the rights of people living with life challenges, the principles of inclusion, a person-centred approach, and seeing a person's gifts and possible ways they may contribute are essential to the care worker.

The RCW worker assists individuals with special needs, such as those with behavioral or mental health disorders, intellectual or developmental disabilities.  Activities of the job may take place in small residential homes, larger group homes or may take a more individualized form of work, such as employment support.  It is vital that there is a good match between clients and their care workers to allow a positive working relationship.

A person's beliefs, values, and attitudes play an important part in the employers' consideration and decision to recruit workers.  Additionally, prospective workers must have a Criminal Record and a Vulnerable Sector (VS) check completed.

CC - Skills, Interests

So what skills, interests, preferred work style and values are essential for the RCW?

  1. Can you work independently, follow directions and manage your time well?

  1. Do you respect individuals and value diversity?

  1. Are you willing and able to do shift work?

  1. Are you good at problem-solving? Have you been told you have sound judgement or common sense?

  1. Are you eager and interested to learn new things?

  1. Do you have good communication skills?

  1. Are you a patient person?

  1. Are you physically fit?

  1. Are you emotionally healthy?

  1. Are you flexible?

  1. Are you comfortable with physical contact?

CC - Do you have what it takes?

A Career in Community Care

Do you have what it takes?

The Nova Scotia Department of Community Services Disability Support Program (DSP) “serves children, youth and adults with intellectual disabilities, long-term mental illness and physical disabilities in a range of community-based, residential and vocational/day programs. These are voluntary programs designed to support people at various stages of their development and independence”. (Reference Government of NS.)

CC- Things to consider

Things to consider:

Several agencies provide services for the Department of Health and Wellness. These organizations employ many caregivers, primarily Continuing Care Assistants (CCA), Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) and Registered Nurses (RN). Each role in continuing care has its specific demands on your interests, abilities, and education, but some qualities are necessary for all. You must be cooperative, mature, responsible, and accountable to work well in these roles.

You may be working one-on-one with a person or assisting other care providers, but you are still part of a team and will work primarily in a policy supported and reasonably structured environment.  It's important to feel comfortable expressing yourself and your opinions to others and to be able to consider their ideas. Most importantly you must remember that the wellbeing of the person receiving care is the most important goal, so cooperation is a necessity in caregiving. You will have to be mature and responsible for your actions because people depend on you.

As a care provider you will be working with people at different stages of their lives, and deal with individuals who are ageing, debilitated, ill, or undergoing rehabilitation.  You may be working in a nursing home, a residential care facility or a private residence.

All workers will be asked to  complete Criminal Record and a Vulnerable Sector (VS) checks by their educational institution, their licensing body or by the prospective employer.

CC - Skills, Interests

So what skills, interests, preferred work style and values are essential for the RCW?

  1. Can you work independently, follow directions and manage your time well?

  1. Do you respect individuals and value diversity?

  1. Are you willing and able to do shift work?

  1. Are you good at problem-solving? Have you been told you have sound judgement or common sense?

  1. Are you eager and interested to learn new things?

  1. Do you have good communication skills?

  1. Are you a patient person?

  1. Are you physically fit?

  1. Are you emotionally healthy?

  1. Are you flexible?

  1. Are you comfortable with physical contact?

CC - Is it a good fit?

CCAs, LPNs and RNs provide routine and essential services in all settings in the continuing care sector in Nova Scotia. They represent the largest pool of employees in the continuing care workforce and are responsible for a range of operations. These workers form the backbone needed to deliver high-quality care and ensure an excellent client experience for Nova Scotians in continuing care.

Do you still think a career in the Continuing Care sector may be a good fit for you?  

Visit the Health Care Human Resource Sector Council and the Continuing Care Assistant program websites to discover more about the work and educational requirements for CCA, LPN and RN.

To discover information about the labour market and pay scales for these professions in Nova Scotia, visit Careers Nova Scotia. CCA, LPN, RN.

Visit the Government of Nova Scotia Department of Health and Wellness website to learn about programs and services available through the Continuing Care Program.

Explore Employer Profiles on the Health Care Human Resource Sector Council website to find organizations close to you.

 

Interested but still not entirely sure if this is the right career path for you?

Talk to CCAs, LPNs and RNs in your community who work in continuing care, either in home care, a nursing home or another residential care facility. Ask them about their jobs; speak to your school career counselor about job shadowing in a continuing care setting; talk to friends or relatives that work in continuing care. You too may choose to care!

 

Not yet ready to fully commit?

There are other options available in the community care sector that you may prefer. Surf the community care section of this webpage and visit the Health Care Human Resource Sector Council career pages to see if there is a better fit for your interests and talents. Very likely there will be a fit for you somewhere in the continuing or community care sectors or perhaps in acute the health care setting. Happy searching for your healthcare career!